Archive for murder

Vintage Comics: The Beyond #2: Valley of the Scaly Monsters, Bubble of Destruction, The Shrieking Terror (Pg. 16- End)

Posted in Comics, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 29, 2017 by ranranami

Running behind on some grad school homework, gang, so I figured I’d share the rest of this comic issue before I hide behind the books. Since I usually take undetermined hiatus after October anyway, I didn’t want to leave you waiting either. Tomorrow, for Halloween, I’ll be featuring a write-up on a very special actor.

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Book of the Week: Look for Me By Moonlight by Mary Downing Hahn

Posted in Books, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 25, 2017 by ranranami

I’m sure I’ve gone on tirades before about what makes a real vampire (or a good one), and the fact that they are not in fact romantic heroes. Dracula, especially, was nothing if not a predator and monster. Now that I’ve gotten that out of the way, I’d like to tell you guys about a wonderfully dark little book I first discovered in middle school, and fell in love with. There’s a romantic gloss to the cover, and a sweet title, belying the dark story behind it.

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If you wanted Sarah to pick Jareth in Labyrinth, perhaps this book isn’t for you. Bowie was gorgeous with his typical glam rock beauty, but he was a man pursuing a little girl who wanted to prove to the world she was a woman. There’s a similar vein in this book about a young girl named Cynda vacationing with her family and trying to find her own way, isolated from the father and stepmother she doesn’t know, as well as the little brother she doesn’t really like. Then, Vincent shows up, and suddenly everything is different. It gets darker, and pretty soon the game Cynda thinks she’s playing spirals out of control. It’s a young adult novel, and certainly appropriate for the audience, but the heart of the story is a disturbing one, and that’s what makes this book so fantastic.

Drive-in Trailers: Hospital Horror

Posted in Media, Movies and shows, Trailers, Videos and Clips with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 19, 2017 by ranranami

 

 

I’ve been fortunate enough to never need surgery, but I think a vast majority of us have had to make a few trips to the hospital for one reason or another, and it’s never fun. But imagine how much worse it would be if you were dealing with serial killers, ghosts, or just plain crazy demons with their own idea of ‘medicine’. This week I’d like to focus on hospital horror trailers, and if you find yourself sitting at home right now trying to fight a nasty case of the flu…please, get well soon.

Book of the Week: Pet Sematary, by Stephen King

Posted in Books, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 18, 2017 by ranranami

It goes without saying that Pet Sematary (the movie) really did have some of the most chilling moments in 90s horror. This is a recommendation for the book, however, which I think may be one of the few I’ve read that was practically identical to the film in all the right ways. Except for the soldier scene, which I would’ve loved to see in the film, but that’s a whole different kettle of fish I might get into later.

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It’s very short, a simple but fun read, and probably one of the less–how should I put it? Colorful? Vulgar? It’s one of Stephen King’s less foul-mouthed works from the time. I don’t often walk down the King road these days, but Pet Sematary will always hold a place in my heart, with its incredibly dark themes, and the basic idea that there is no true return from death. No matter what. Doctor Frankenstein couldn’t seem to accept that, and neither does Doctor Louis Creed. Both of them learned the hard way. A beautifully grim lesson to anyone who decides to dabble with the forces of life and death.

Horror Flick of the Week: Popcorn (1991)

Posted in Media, Movies and shows, Trailers, Videos and Clips with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 17, 2017 by ranranami

This one took more than one attempt to watch, because it opens with a trippy dream sequence. Narration and dream sequences are two film devices I tend to struggle with, as they are fairly lazy attempts to tell a story without properly showing it. Then, just a couple of weeks ago, I tried again. Why? Because just look at that poster! There’s no way in hell a movie could have a poster like this and not turn out to be awesome!

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This time I made it. After the dream sequence, which I can appreciate now is a clear not to Giallo, the movie got so much better. College students get one special night to take what could possibly be one of the most incredible movie theaters in history and host a horror film marathon. William Castle style. Gigantic props flying around, smell-o-vision, shockers in the seats, and everything in-between. Popcorn is a bit of a love story to classic horror, despite the main actress’s at times grating voice (despite this, Jill Schoelen was, and is, a lovely person). It doesn’t stop there, however, as strange memories plague her character throughout the film, and bizarre murders begin to take place. Madness? Ghosts? A killer stalking the night? I guess you’ll have to find out for yourself.

Vintage Comics: Nightmare, Issue #3: The Werewolf of Washington Square, Cup of Moonglow (Cover – Pg. 13)

Posted in Comics, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 12, 2017 by ranranami

Whew! Almost mid-October (happy Friday the 13th, and I hope you’re enjoying a bit of Jason slaughter today!) The posts are warming up, and so is my grad school homework. Still, I’ve found time to upload yet another vintage comic. This one is in far worse shape than the others I’ve managed to scrounge up, but the art is – – well, how should I put it? Cartoonier? A little more offbeat? Somehow, at the same time, certain elements of these stories are also pretty detailed towards realism. In fact, the werewolf face is remarkably similar to Dr. Hyde in the ’31 film. 21 years after the fact, I can’t help but wonder if the artist sourced a lobby card or old poster, perhaps?

Following on the tail-end of the glory days (pre-code horror comics), I sort of appreciate the pulp-ish inspiration they clearly drew from on the cover art. It’s also a victim of radio-style dialog, per usual for the earlier stuff, but there’s a certain charm to that too. The first story is…well…I mean it’s a basic werewolf plot. Incredbly basic. Bare bones down to the character name (Eric Lupin.) The second story proves yet another age-old fact. You can’t trust men. You can’t trust women. You definitely can’t trust gigantic Amazonian witch snakes.

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Book of the Week: Evil Ernie – Youth Gone Wild, by Brian Pulido

Posted in Comics, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 11, 2017 by ranranami

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It’s not pretty. It’s not happy. Hell, it’s not even cute, but you can’t deny this one simple fact: Evil Ernie rocks. For those of you familiar with The Mask series of comics, you know, the dark one, I’m sure your appetite for violence and animated gore is fairly intense. So why not give Evil Ernie a shot?

It’s not really about the plot. A young man driven mad by a combination of severe child abuse and a bizarre dream machine that links him to lady death (either death incarnate, or just a really crazy bitch who likes to wake up to a pile of corpses in the morning). One thing leads to another, and he gets killed with yet another experiment, only to come back with mental powers. Every person he kills becomes a bloodthirsty zombie, intent on helping Ernie create an army of ‘friends’.

That’s really all there is to the plot, to be honest, but it’s a fun ride there, and this issue only left me hungry for the rest of them.