Archive for murder

Vintage Magazine: Famous Monsters of Filmland, Vol. 1, No. 1 (50 – 63)

Posted in MAgazines, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 22, 2019 by ranranami

Not much to say this issue except – I wonder how that voodoo snake ring works? It’s gotta be a good deal at only $1…unless they cut off right before ‘+ shipping and soul handling’.

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Drive-In Trailers: Slash and Trash

Posted in Media, Movies and shows, Trailers, Videos and Clips with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 17, 2018 by ranranami

With the Halloween-crazy trend this month, I decided it might be time to tackle slasher movie trailers. What better way to pay tribute to the movie that started it all than to look at some of the many, many, many campy movies it inspired?

Book of the Week: The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson

Posted in Books, Media, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on October 6, 2018 by ranranami

When I was a kid, hands-down Amityville horror was one of those movies that was so dark and creepy, I couldn’t really sit through it until I was probably 10 (which, if you’ve read and heard my ramblings over the last few years, you’ll realize was pretty late for me, considering I had watched Dead Alive probably a dozen times at that point.) This is the book that started it all.

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I’m not going to say it’s based on a true story. I desperately want to, but I think we can all agree that events in this story are highly dramatized. There have been lawsuits. Debates. Fights. I’d like to believe drunken horror nerd brawls, even, about the events in this book based on the horrific ghostly experiences of the Lutz family in 1975. They left the house in just under a month.

For context, in 1974 Ronald DeFreo Jr brutally murdered his family in this house (which, to its credit, looks like a pretty damn creepy house even without the overlay and flames on the modernized book cover above). This book is not about Ronald, but each element of the book sort of comes together very well, and if you haven’t had enough of the fictional story, there’s so much you can explore after you’ve read this (from DeFreo to the Warrens, a pair of paranormal investigators whose cases inspired Jay Anson to write this). True or not, it’s a great book, a modern classic, and well worth your time on a stormy night or a sunny day.

Vintage Comics: The Beyond #2: Valley of the Scaly Monsters, Bubble of Destruction, The Shrieking Terror (Pg. 16- End)

Posted in Comics, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 29, 2017 by ranranami

Running behind on some grad school homework, gang, so I figured I’d share the rest of this comic issue before I hide behind the books. Since I usually take undetermined hiatus after October anyway, I didn’t want to leave you waiting either. Tomorrow, for Halloween, I’ll be featuring a write-up on a very special actor.

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Book of the Week: Look for Me By Moonlight by Mary Downing Hahn

Posted in Books, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 25, 2017 by ranranami

I’m sure I’ve gone on tirades before about what makes a real vampire (or a good one), and the fact that they are not in fact romantic heroes. Dracula, especially, was nothing if not a predator and monster. Now that I’ve gotten that out of the way, I’d like to tell you guys about a wonderfully dark little book I first discovered in middle school, and fell in love with. There’s a romantic gloss to the cover, and a sweet title, belying the dark story behind it.

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If you wanted Sarah to pick Jareth in Labyrinth, perhaps this book isn’t for you. Bowie was gorgeous with his typical glam rock beauty, but he was a man pursuing a little girl who wanted to prove to the world she was a woman. There’s a similar vein in this book about a young girl named Cynda vacationing with her family and trying to find her own way, isolated from the father and stepmother she doesn’t know, as well as the little brother she doesn’t really like. Then, Vincent shows up, and suddenly everything is different. It gets darker, and pretty soon the game Cynda thinks she’s playing spirals out of control. It’s a young adult novel, and certainly appropriate for the audience, but the heart of the story is a disturbing one, and that’s what makes this book so fantastic.

Drive-in Trailers: Hospital Horror

Posted in Media, Movies and shows, Trailers, Videos and Clips with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 19, 2017 by ranranami

 

 

I’ve been fortunate enough to never need surgery, but I think a vast majority of us have had to make a few trips to the hospital for one reason or another, and it’s never fun. But imagine how much worse it would be if you were dealing with serial killers, ghosts, or just plain crazy demons with their own idea of ‘medicine’. This week I’d like to focus on hospital horror trailers, and if you find yourself sitting at home right now trying to fight a nasty case of the flu…please, get well soon.

Book of the Week: Pet Sematary, by Stephen King

Posted in Books, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 18, 2017 by ranranami

It goes without saying that Pet Sematary (the movie) really did have some of the most chilling moments in 90s horror. This is a recommendation for the book, however, which I think may be one of the few I’ve read that was practically identical to the film in all the right ways. Except for the soldier scene, which I would’ve loved to see in the film, but that’s a whole different kettle of fish I might get into later.

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It’s very short, a simple but fun read, and probably one of the less–how should I put it? Colorful? Vulgar? It’s one of Stephen King’s less foul-mouthed works from the time. I don’t often walk down the King road these days, but Pet Sematary will always hold a place in my heart, with its incredibly dark themes, and the basic idea that there is no true return from death. No matter what. Doctor Frankenstein couldn’t seem to accept that, and neither does Doctor Louis Creed. Both of them learned the hard way. A beautifully grim lesson to anyone who decides to dabble with the forces of life and death.