Archive for sematary

Book of the Week: Pet Sematary, by Stephen King

Posted in Books, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 18, 2017 by ranranami

It goes without saying that Pet Sematary (the movie) really did have some of the most chilling moments in 90s horror. This is a recommendation for the book, however, which I think may be one of the few I’ve read that was practically identical to the film in all the right ways. Except for the soldier scene, which I would’ve loved to see in the film, but that’s a whole different kettle of fish I might get into later.

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It’s very short, a simple but fun read, and probably one of the less–how should I put it? Colorful? Vulgar? It’s one of Stephen King’s less foul-mouthed works from the time. I don’t often walk down the King road these days, but Pet Sematary will always hold a place in my heart, with its incredibly dark themes, and the basic idea that there is no true return from death. No matter what. Doctor Frankenstein couldn’t seem to accept that, and neither does Doctor Louis Creed. Both of them learned the hard way. A beautifully grim lesson to anyone who decides to dabble with the forces of life and death.

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Horror Flick of the Week: Pet Sematary (1989)

Posted in Movies and shows, Trailers, Videos and Clips with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 17, 2015 by ranranami

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Sometimes this one gets a bad wrap. Mostly from people who expect 90% of good cinema doesn’t date itself, which is just silly. One thing I love about this movie, is that it’s just about the closest adaptation of a Stephen King book I’ve ever seen (from the ones I’ve read, that is.) Not to mention the child actor who played Gage (Miko Hughes) was incredibly disturbing as he transitioned from the role of an innocent baby to basically a demonically-possessed corpse. It’s also deliciously campy in a way modern horror directors tend to forget can be a good thing when done right.

This movie is a collection of great moments. The concept alone makes for a pretty spooky story:
– An old burial ground that resurrects whatever is buried there, in a manner of speaking, and sends them on soul-less rampages to destroy whoever the living person might have cherished.
– A wise old man with dark knowledge of the Pet Sematary’s past, played by none other than Fred Gwynne (otherwise famous for his role as Herman Munster).
– An evil cat.
– An even more evil child.
– The compulsion to return to this forbidden place and try your luck again, knowing full well nothing good can come of it.
– And also a daughter conveniently forgotten who apparently has visions of the future.

I mean, Pet Sematary has a lot going for it, if you’re looking for something to watch alone or with friends on a stormy night. And that’s why it’s the horror flick of the week.