Episode 72 – Rocktober III: The Quickening

Posted in podcast on October 19, 2019 by ranranami

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This week we’re bringing you three metal horror movies and featuring a special guest, James from the Popcultnet podcast! Will Corey and Maddy finally escape the clutches of Coyote Guy Jake? No! But they will talk about ‘Zombie Nightmare’, ‘Rocktober Blood’ and ‘Slaughterhouse Rock’! It’s a week of zombies, slashers, and ghosts with sweet dance moves this week on Hallow-Holics Anonymous!

Check out this episode!

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A Tribute to Vincent Price

Posted in Media, Movies and shows, People, Videos and Clips with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 18, 2019 by ranranami

A lover, and some might even say expert on art and food, a brilliant dramatic actor, and an even more brilliant character actor who chewed the scenery so well in his performances that he might as well have seasoned and sauteed them first. A man who could bring such charm to his role that even the lowest budget picture he might have worked on had an air of class to it regardless of the plot or dialog. Yes, my friends, it’s finally time – – to talk about my idol, Vincent Price.

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I legitimately tried to think of one role he was lackluster in, one part Mister Price was just obviously in need of a paycheck. Even the many many advertisements he sponsored later in his life. Nothing came to mind. He was just that good. What’s more, half of his villains I couldn’t help but love. Except, of course, for the rare few he played an absolute bastard. Don’t let that fool you though, he was very good at that too.

Born in 1911 in St. Louis to a pretty well-off family, he had the good fortune to begin life with a good education, unsurprisingly getting a bachelors in history and language at Yale. This was also where he began to act, and later in life he would return to a production he likely knew very well, playing Sir Despard Murgatroyd in Ruddigore which I can’t recommend enough if you’re fond of Gilbert and Sullivan operettas. Expanding his education at the University of London, studying art and even more history, his acting career began. In fact, he worked with Orson Welles’s Mercurey Theatre. It wasn’t long before he moved on to Broadway, and in 1938 his film acting career began. Dragonwyck (1946) is probably one of my absolute favorite early pictures of his before he truly blossomed as a well-known horror actor in particular. His roles were so varied that it would be impossible to list them all here without turning this short tribute into a lengthy biography, but suffice it to say House of Wax (1953) really marks when the horror element of his career took off.

He did fantastic voice-work in radio, and if you ever get the chance you absolutely have to dig up some episodes of The Saint, wherein he played a sort of detective crime-fighter with a Robin Hood flair.

Vincent was also a bit of an art philanthropist, donating 2000+ works from his collection over the years to the LA College and helping create the country’s first teaching art collection. He wrote many wonderful cookbooks (one of which I’ve had my eye on for several years, A Treasury of Great Recipes). If the world had a dozen more people like Vincent Price, I can’t imagine we wouldn’t have a modern renaissance. Sadly, however, there was only one. A legend in his or anyone else’s time. All that being said, here is a wonderful tribute by LordStoneRaven.

Vintage Magazine: Famous Monsters of Filmland, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Pg. 31 – 49)

Posted in MAgazines, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 17, 2019 by ranranami

Some like to say the printed word is dying (which I disagree with) and others say that magazines will be a thing of the past in the future. Honestly, that one’s harder to argue against. Just a couple of weeks ago I saw a three-pack at the store of Halloween-themed magazines I won’t name. I was so excited to get a bunch of fun recipes and pictures and craft ideas, but in actuality all I found were a bunch of ads for junk I’d never buy. That’s all magazines are now unless you’re paying premium prices. Look back to older publications like this, though, and the ads are few/far-between, and they certainly don’t dominate the whole thing. Ah well, rant over. Enjoy these awesome stills, pranks, and fun articles. Bonus points to the awesome ‘Mad Magician’ page about Vincent Price and his many colorful deaths.

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Book of the Week: The Mask (comic book series) by John Arcudie and Doug Mahnkie

Posted in Books, Comics, Media with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 16, 2019 by ranranami

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I’ve been wanting to talk about this one for awhile. I’m sure most of you reading probably grew up knowing the movie just as well as I did, and may have even watched the 90s cartoon. Wasn’t the 90s a great time for cartoon spin-offs? Killer Tomatoes was probably my favorite…

None of those spin-offs, and not even the movie were even remotely close to just how dark the comics they were based on turned out to be when I finally read it. The Mask doesn’t just imbue a person with cartoonish super powers and strip them of their inhibitions, it strips them of their sanity altogether as the ultimate cost. This series is just as wonderfully violent as Evil Ernie, with ample gore to satisfy the grimmest comic fans. Prior to the film and cartoons, the mask was called ‘Big Head’. Stanley is no hero. The Mask is more of a monkey’s paw than a gift, or maybe even a Jekyll and Hyde potion. It’s a fantastic series, and I can’t recommend it enough. Especially if you enjoy having your childhood memories shredded.

Featured Phobia: Catoptrophobia (fear of mirrors)

Posted in People, Videos and Clips with tags , , , , , , , , on October 15, 2019 by ranranami

Say that one three times fast. Catoptrophobia, catoptrophiblia, catroptohobi…Let’s just call it fear of mirrors. This should be one we’re all well aware of, and why not? Everyone is raised on some myth about a monster in the mirror, usually Bloody Mary, sometimes Candyman if you prefer horror movies to stories. When we’re toddlers, we learn about object permanence, and examining your reflection is a major part of the process. It’s also oddly magical in a manner of speaking. You see yourself, and deep down the primitive part of your soul may wonder whether that’s actually you looking back, or something far more sinister.

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Catoptrophobia isn’t really about fearing the mirror itself. It’s the reflection. Reflection of the self, of objects, or even words being mouthed. Some people find this fear so entrenched that even seeing a shiny surface that can reflect an image back, whether it’s clear or not. A vast majority of sufferers associate mirrors with the supernatural, and these fears can often stem from religious or superstitious beliefs. Sometimes it merely relates to poor self image, as with those suffering from body dysmorphia.

Gradual exposure, psychotherapy, and ‘talk therapy’ through support groups are common ways of treating this fear. However, given that it can relate to concerns about the supernatural, even homeopathic remedies might have a place for the sufferer who believes in them. At the end of the day, my only real advice to you is fairly simple. You can run, you can even hide your reflection, but never break a mirror. I think you know why.

Additionally, I can’t resist sharing this scene from my favorite Nightmare on Elm Street film (part 4), so for those who haven’t seen it – – you may want to sit this one out.

Episode 71 – Rocktober II: Electric Boogaloo

Posted in podcast on October 14, 2019 by ranranami

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Rocking back at you with our second course of Rocktober, this week Maddy and Corey are still trapped by a demented Radio jockey in his studio – – and this time, rock is the villain in ‘Black Roses’ from 1988, as well as the epic rock opera ‘Phantom of the Paradise’ from 1974.

Check out this episode!

Horror Flick of the Week

Posted in Media, Movies and shows, Trailers, Videos and Clips with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2019 by ranranami

I’m going to preface this by saying this is not the greatest anthology film of all time, but it is one of the most iconic. Obligatory pretentious ‘every true horror fan’ (or at least the ones old enough to have grown up with video store memories) remembers the image of the vicious little tribal doll with his sharp teeth and endless torment of poor innocent Karen Black – – which, incidentally is one reason I’m featuring this movie for the week. Karen Black.

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She was memorable. A character actress who may not be absolutely infamous in the mainstream, but still left her mark in 70s tv movies and independent film. Directed by Dan Curtis, based on stories by Richard Matheson, trilogy of terror is a fun and cheesy exploration of Karen Black’s character acting skills. It’s junk food. It’s relatively tame by today’s horror standards. Yet some elements of the movie are still a little disturbing. They stick with you, and if you watch it once, chances are you’ll come back again for several re-watches of Trilogy of Terror.